FAQs

Q?

My dog has long nails what should I do?

A.

If a dog’s nails become too overgrown they can start growing into the skin. This is painful and can cause infection. Clipping is better than filing. It’s important not to cut too high up the nail or you risk cutting the ‘quick’ – the blood vessel and nerve which run through the middle of the nail. You can see the quick in pale nails, but not in black nails, so they need careful trimming a bit at a time. Ask our staff to show you how it’s done with a good pair of clippers.

Q?

When should I worm my dog?

A.

Most puppies are born with worms, which is why puppies should be wormed at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks of age, and then every three months for life with an all-wormer. Pregnant and nursing mothers should also be treated during mating, before the birth of their puppies, and every three months.

Worming treatments are easy and effective to use, but it is important to read the label, as you may need to use multiple products to protect your puppy against all types of worms. Heavy worm infestations in puppies should be repeated 10 days after the initial dose is administered. If you’re having problems administering your puppy’s treatment, ask your veterinarian for a demonstration during your next vet consult.

Q?

Why is my dog losing hair?

A.

There are many possible causes – but one of the most common is fleas. Some people think that fleas only live in dirty houses. Wrong. Fleas will breed and thrive in almost any home with central heating. The solution is stop fleas with safe, effective treatments when problems arise. Ask our staff for an effective product they can also destroy flea eggs

You’ll need to treat your dog, other dogs and cats in your home and your home itself – especially your dog's sleeping and resting areas. Other causes of the fur loss, such as mites, infection or allergies can be identified by your vet.

Q?

Should my female dog have a litter before she is spayed?

A.

No. There’s no benefit to your female dog, and by delaying getting her spayed you increase her risk of uterus infection or getting breast cancer.

Q?

Should I get my dog vaccinated?

A.

Yes. Dog vaccination protects your dog against various diseases which can cause pain, distress and are often fatal. By vaccinating your dog you have peace of mind, knowing that you have provided protection. As well as safeguarding your own pet, it also prevents diseases from being passed onto other animals.

Q?

My dog has bad breath what can I do to stop this.

A.

This is the result of dental disease which is common in dogs. So brush your dog’s teeth regularly with doggy toothpaste. If your dog has tartar on his teeth, this has to be removed first and can be done with an ultrasonic tooth brush that will break up the plaque by high frequency vibration.

Q?

Will my dog put on weight after being neutered?

A.

Dogs should only have the amount of calories they need. If they have more they will put on weight. It is true that a dog's metabolic rate can drop after neutering. So you either need to reduce their calories or increase their exercise. Ask our staff  for advice on suitable diets.

Q?

How do I stop my dog from pulling hard on the lead?

A.

You should visit our dog training sessions to learn the correct way to train your dog to heel on the correct lead. Persistent pulling can be corrected by a special dog lead called a Halti training lead which prevents the dog from pulling ahead.

Q?

How can I stop my dog being sick in the car?

A.

Getting your dog used to the vehicle is key here. When your car is parked safely and there’s no risk to you or your pet, let your dog play in it. Maybe then feed it some treats there and take it on a short journey followed by a short walk. When traveling, make sure your dog is in a doggy seat belt. Some dogs like to look out of the window, but this can cause sickness in others. You could give calming pheromones – talk to our veterinary assistant to see if they may help your dog.

Q?

What’s the Benefit of Microchipping My Pet?

A.

Microchips keep your pet constantly identified; unlike ID tags on a collar which could be chewed away or torn off, microchips are implanted under the skin. A pet can’t remove it by accident or on purpose, meaning they’re identified even in the event of an unexpected escape!

Another great benefit of microchips is that it’s easy to have your pet’s chip updated should you get a new telephone number or address. You don’t have to purchase an entirely new chip—simply contact the UK Pet Registry and have them update your information after providing security checks.

Q?

What should I feed my pet?

A.

There exists vast pet food choices these days and the selection can be overwhelming. Depending on your pet’s age, needs, and medical condition, there are numerous foods available for your pet’s individual nutritional needs. We will be glad to discuss the best dietary choice for your pet. Call us today on 01908 661533 and ask for Ron .

Q?

How do I book my puppy into a puppy training class?

A.

Puppy Socialisation

PRICE - £2 PER PUPPY

For puppies under 26 weeks.
Puppies must be fully vaccinated and allowed out.
You must bring your puppy's vaccination card to the first puppy party you attend.
Puppy socialisation is extremely important and provides your puppy with key life skills.

Held at Walnut Pet Supplies - MK7 7AE:
Mondays 6.00 - 6.30 pm (outside venue)

Q?

What Exotic Pet Species Should Be Spayed/Neutered?

A.

Due to the many health benefits that spaying/neutering can provide (reduced risk of uterine infections, cancers, testicular tumors, etc.), we recommend that all rabbits, guinea pigs and rats be neutered. Spaying is strongly urged for rabbits, young guinea pigs, and young rats.

Q?

What Kinds of Collars and Leashes Are Best for Dogs?

A.

Wide varieties of collars exist. Leather collars are nice, strong and sturdy, but they do pick up smells and if they get wet, may become brittle or start to rot. The rolled leather variety avoid the chafing or hair breakage that flat collars sometimes do to dogs.
Metal link 'choke' chains are not recommended except for correction training where the techniques must be learned and applied correctly.
Halter style collars act on the nose preventing a strong dog from pulling. Similar to chains you do not leave these collars on unattended dogs.
Harnesses are useful if your dog is small or delicate, using a harness instead of a collar when walking will avoid neck injuries. Be sure the harness fits comfortably and will not chafe the arm pits. You will probably want to use the harness for walking and still have a normal collar for the tags. If you have a big dog that likes to pull, getting a harness will only improve pulling power.
Wireless collars are not recommended because they always destroy your dog's confidence and well-being.
We like flat buckle or quick release collars of nylon that fit properly. Take care not to pinch the dog's skin with these or your best friend will have an 'anxiety' moment every time you put them on.

Leads or leashes also come in many varieties. The popular flex-lead is spring loaded and quite long allowing your dog some freedom to roam. We recommend a rope lead with a spring hook and a simple rope lead for retriever training and working tests when a collar is never worn for safety.

Q?

Where do I get my pet from?

A.

A local rescue centre is a good choice. This is often an excellent method of sourcing a healthy new pet. The pets are usually health checked, vaccinated and micro-chipped prior to sale.

We also recommend Rescue societies for particular breeds. For most of the common breeds there are rescue societies which are responsible for re-homing dogs from that particular breed.

Q?

Should my dog or cat be spayed or neutered?

A.

If you do not intend to breed then we recommend spaying/neutering as pets are less prone to a variety of diseases. Spayed females have a lower risk of mammary cancer (90% fatal in cats and 50% fatal in dogs) and life-threatening uterine infections. Neutered males have no risk of testicular disease and a lower risk of prostate diseases. Plus, the cost to have your pet spayed or neutered  is a lot less than the cost to have and care for a litter or litters.

Spaying/neutering can lead to better pet behavior! A spayed female won’t go into heat which will prevent yowling, frequent urination and discharge. Neutered male dogs are usually better behaved and will not feel the need to mark their territory. A neutered male dog won’t be as inclined to roam in search of a mate; roaming animals can cause vehicular accidents and scare children.

Spaying/neutering can prevent fights between pets. Fights between pets can be serious, causing deep wounds and transmitting deadly diseases. Neutered males tend to be less aggressive to both animals and people, especially if neutered at an early age.

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